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Is it best to sell furnished or unfurnished?

by ShelMarkblog In Uncategorized

19 April 2018

If you were looking for a new home, would you prefer to inspect an empty home to assess the space available for your own furniture? Or would you prefer to see a furnished home?

Some people argue that an empty home lacks character and visual appeal, while others argue that styling an empty home is not worth it.

So, do houses sell better unfurnished or furnished? The truth is, there are pros and cons for both.

Pros of selling a house unfurnished

  • An unfurnished home is always uninhabited, meaning it can be shown at the last minute. This can equate to more viewings, potentially leading to a faster sale.
  • It creates a ‘blank canvas’ for buyers to use their imagination. Some buyers say an unfurnished home allows them to imagine themselves living there more readily than a furnished home.

Cons of selling a house unfurnished

  • As hard as it may be to believe, an empty house can actually appear smaller than a furnished home.
  • Empty houses can give the impression of being abandoned, prompting some buyers to question why the owners were in such a hurry to leave and sell.
  • An empty house emphasises all imperfections. Even small marks on the walls and floors are more visible without furniture and decorative touches in the room.

Pros of selling a house furnished 

  • It shows the buyer how the space can be used. Cleverly positioned furniture will actually make the space appear larger and more versatile.
  • It speaks to a buyer’s emotions, not just their logic and most homebuyers buy on emotion. A furnished, well-decorated (not cluttered) house makes it feel more like a home.
  • It is more likely to create a lasting first impression.

Cons of selling a house furnished

  • If you are in a hurry to move out, it can be an inconvenience to keep the house furnished or have furniture brought in.
  • Unless it is well furnished and styled, it can actually reduce the appeal of your home and the value of the property in the buyer’s mind.
  • Over furnishing a room may crowd it, making it seem smaller than it is.

We offer a professional styling service and have had great success with it in terms of increased property value and speed of sale. Contact us to learn more.


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Going up to downsize

by ShelMarkblog In Uncategorized

15 April 2018

If there is one thing we know about Melville it is that the suburb is full of large family-style homes and almost totally built-out (unlike neighbouring Cockburn).

In fact, Melville has more 5-bedroom + houses than almost any other suburb in Perth.

However, to cope with Perth’s rising population, Melville is required by State Government to make way for an additional:

• 11,000 dwellings by 2031 and
• 18,000 dwellings by 2050

So how can Melville keep its rapidly increasing aging population in place when there are few smaller homes in the suburb to downsize to and cope with the anticipated increase in population?

The Council has come up with a strategy that they believe could help solve the issue. And it involves going up.

The City of Melville’s new Local Housing Strategy focuses on increasing its limited housing stock by increasing apartment and townhouse construction around six activity centres and transport corridors, avoiding the suburbs, where council hopes to preserve the low-density R25 zoning as much as possible.

What do Melville residents want?

A survey to all Melville residents found that there is a strong desire to live near shops, restaurants and public transport, but little desire to live near work, a clear indication of the number of retirees or people approaching retirement currently living in the area.

Also high on the preference list was:

• Low maintenance
• Close to parks and nature

While there was limited support for apartment blocks above four storeys, it is believed that respondents may have been swayed by the current poor examples in Melville, which date back to the 1960s and 70s.

Data also showed that the rate of home ownership among seniors is dropping, due to the high cost of land in the area.

While nothing can be done by local government about the price of land, higher density housing around transport hubs and the town centre is a very effective solution.

Council will also keep a watchful eye on how Fremantle’s ‘Tiny Homes’ policy (granny flats in backyards) pans out, but is unlikely to follow Fremantle’s lead, at least not for now.


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