HOME | FOR SALE | FOR YOU | ABOUT US | CONTACT US

Free Appraisal Weekly Property Update

Licensed Real Estate Agents Shelley and Mark are renowned for their exceptional customer service, strong local knowledge and high ethical standards. 

 
The unique combination of Shelley and Mark’s team-based way of working and proven business philosophies, presence and marketing tools is your winning formula for success and the reason so much of their business results from word-of-mouth referral and people who keep coming back.
BLOG

Investment special – how to minimise Capital Gains Tax

by ShelMarkblog In Uncategorized

19 June 2018

It’s almost tax time. If you own an investment property and are thinking about selling, you will no doubt want to know the best ways to avoid or at least minimise Capital Gains Tax.

Leading property investment expert, Michael Yardney spoke with tax expert, Ken Raiss who shared a few strategies to consider.

Before we discuss how to avoid or minimise your Capital Gains Tax (CGT), let’s take a step back and outline how CGT is calculated.

If you own an investment property and decide to sell it, Capital Gains Tax is calculated based on the net sale price of the property minus your expenses. This gain is added to your income for the financial year (as well as the income of any other title holder) and the final figure is used to calculate the applicable tax.

What expenses can you include as deductions?

The list of allowable expenses is long. They include (but are not limited to) the following:

  • Incidental costs like stamp duty, legal fees, some bank fees, buyers agent fees, advertising and marketing fees, and some travel expenses
  • Ownership costs like property searches and inspection fees
  • Improvement costs, including kitchen and bathroom renovations, flooring or essentially any improvements you have made on the property
  • Title costs – legal fees

When selling, the costs associated with the sale, such as agent’s fees, styling, repainting etc. are used to reduce the gross selling price.

If you have owned the investment property for over 12 months, the capital gain can be reduced by 50%. However you would have to add back the benefit of any depreciation claimed during the ownership period.

You only pay Capital Gains Tax if you have made a profit

At the end of the day, if you have to pay CGT it means you have made a profit on the sale of your investment property, which is the goal of owning the property in the first place.

Some investors make a capital loss and therefore pay no CGT, but this is not something you would aspire to. If you do make a capital loss, the good news is that you can carry the loss forward to offset any future capital gains you make.

Click here to watch a five and a half minute video interview between Michael Yardney and Ken Raiss as they discuss this important topic in more depth. A must watch if you own an investment property or are thinking about investing.

It is important to note that this information is general in nature and intended for educational purposes only. Always seek independent advice before making any financial decisions about your own investments and taxes.


Comments (0)


What will homebuyers want in 5 years?

by ShelMarkblog In Uncategorized

11 June 2018

If you are planning to build or renovate your home, it pays to understand what homebuyers of the future will be looking for. Why? Because, while you build and renovate for lifestyle factors today, the astute homeowner knows that you should also consider future resale potential, especially when you consider that most people today move every few years.

So how can you make sure your home still has the same appeal for whoever buys it in around five years time when you’re ready to move on?

Here are the some of the things you might want to consider in order to future-proof your build or renovation project:

1. Give your home a lift (literally) if you build over multiple levels. The reason behind this thinking is that experts believe we need to take Australia’s aging population into consideration. For properties spanning two or more levels, you should consider installing a lift, or you’ll automatically alienate ‘downsizers’ from your potential future market.

2. Focus on quality. If you follow the residential property market, you may have noticed that some apartments that sold off the plan a few years ago are now selling for less than they did brand new. In many cases, this is not just related to a downturn in the property market. Rather, it is due to the fact that many were not built to a high quality standard and therefore suffer the strains of wear and tear more quickly than quality built projects do. When looking for a builder, do your research and speak to former clients of theirs if you can.

3. Automation and connectivity. It’s only a matter of time before most homes will feature some form of electronic automation. Many buyers will, at a minimum, expect automated security and a number will want all security features to be connected wirelessly. If you can factor things like this into your new build or renovation now, it will save you doing so down the track.

4. Go for a timeless classic look. If you go for the latest trends in your design and an ultra modern look, you run the risk of it dating quickly. The best advice is to keep things classically modern and timeless without going over the top and running the risk that future buyers will either love it or hate it.

5. Focus on alfresco living. More and more, buyers are telling builders and real estate agents that an alfresco area is a must. Pay close attention to this important ‘room’ in the house.


Comments (0)


6 things to consider when buying a home in your twenty’s

by ShelMarkblog In Uncategorized

01 June 2018

Are you in your twenty’s? If so, home ownership may either be the furthest thing from your mind (perhaps because of a perception that it is unattainable) or it may be a goal on which you are intensely focused.

Perhaps you are a parent with adult children living at home and wondering how an earth your kids will ever be able to afford the ‘Great Australian Dream’ the way you could at their age.

Is there a ‘right time’ to buy your first home? The answer is no. In fact owning a home during this early stage of life can be a burden if you’re not ready.

Here are 6 things to consider if you’re thinking about buying a home in your twenty’s.

  1. Get comfortable with making sacrifices– Saving for a deposit or paying off a mortgage takes sacrifices. These sacrifices may include things like swapping a bought lunch during the working week to BYO lunch from home, getting creative with your wardrobe and entertaining friends at home rather than going out.
  2. Don’t be afraid of having a debt– Given that the median price of a house in Perth currently stands at around $517,000 ($410,000 for a unit) most young people need a substantial mortgage for their first home. Remember, no lending institution will approve a loan for you if they feel you can’t afford to pay it off. That said, the number can still look daunting when you are not used to having a debt any higher than perhaps a loan to pay off a car. Remember, you have around 30 years to pay it off. Keep reminding yourself of the long-term benefits of owning property.
  3. Welcome DIY projects– You will find that owning your own home will make you want to improve the space you’re in. Given most won’t be able to afford to have refurbishments done for them by a professional, it’s time to roll up the sleeves, get out the paint charts and get ready to do it yourself. The rewards of your efforts will be worth it.
  4. Stay on top of what the market is doing– Sign up to newsletters and blogs written by professionals (like the one you’re reading right now), research the market, say yes to receiving market updates. The more you know, the better the decisions you will be able to make in relation to building your wealth through property.
  5. Stay on top of bill payments– If you live independently before you buy your first home, you will be familiar with bills rolling in. But for those who buy their first home after living with mum and dad, receiving bills will be unfamiliar territory. Get used to it! And stay on top of your bill payments. One way to do this is to set yourself up for electronic payments.
  6. Regularly remind yourself of the massive achievement you have made– It can be hard to stay mentally focused and enthusiastic when your friends are still partying and you’ve got bills and a mortgage to pay. Keep reminding yourself of the incredible achievement you have made in owning your own home and take it day by day. Don’t be overwhelmed by the idea of a thirty-year commitment.

 


Comments (0)


5 tips to lighten the load before moving

by ShelMarkblog In Uncategorized

03 May 2018

Moving house is known to be one of life’s most stressful events. Just the thought of packing up the mountain of ‘stuff’ you and your family have accumulated over many years can be so overwhelming you have no idea where to start.

The good news is it doesn’t have to be that way. With a little strategic planning and organisation in advance, you can lighten the load both literally and figuratively.

Start by visualising how you want your new place to look and feel and then imagine how your current things will fit in that space.

Here are 5 tips to get you started:

  1. Focus on one area at a time– this could be a room, a cupboard or even just a drawer. It is best to start in an area you use the least. For instance, you may decide to eat all meals in the family room in the lead-up to the move and focus on the dining room to begin with.
  2. Clear and sort– as you go through each drawer, cupboard and room (one by one) look for items that you no longer use or like. If you’re like most of us, chances are you have already hidden away items like this. Pull them out and get started. Have two piles – a sort pile and a clear pile for items you will either give away or discard.
  3. De-clutter– moving is the ideal opportunity to start afresh. Start deciding what will come with you and what won’t well before the moving date. Remember, you will be paying people to move your things (if you go with a removalist company).
  4. Create a keepsake box for each member of the family– these are all those special items, from photo albums to old teddy bears and hand-made cards, which mean something to each family member. If you have kids they can help with this process.
  5. Make a trip to your local charity collection point– to drop off any items of clean, quality items of clothing no longer worn. Again, do this before you move. It will lighten the load and make you feel good at the same time.

The above points may seem obvious but it’s amazing how many people leave the ‘dreaded’ packing till the last minute and end up boxing everything they own. A little forward thinking and time spent clearing, sorting and disposing will have you feeling organised and excited for the big day.

A final tip – Make the most of the few weeks between exchange of contracts and settlement to get these jobs done.

 


Comments (0)


Inspections put you in control

by ShelMarkblog In Uncategorized

28 April 2018

When it comes to building and pest inspections, most people assume that they are left to the buyers to arrange if they wish. But having your home inspected for structural and termite damage can be highly advantageous if you’re selling too.  In fact we recommend sellers arrange their own Building and Timber Pest Inspections prior to putting their home on the market.

Here’s why…

Ignorance is not bliss when it comes to your greatest financial asset

Arranging your own Building and Timber Pest Inspection allows you to address any issues and avoid last minute surprises. Even if your property appears to be structurally sound and termite-free, there could be hidden problems lurking in the foundations, roof, plumbing, wiring or walls that only a professional can identify.

While many buyers will still insist on having their own pre-purchase building and pest inspections conducted, showing them the reports that you have had prepared in advance proves you have nothing to hide about the condition of your property. It instills confidence in potential buyers.

It is an excellent way to ensure your property is presented in the best way possible

Unless your home is brand new (or almost new) there is always the chance that minor maintenance issues are identified. A professional builder will alert you to those and offer suggestions (as simple as a fresh coat of paint, fixing leaky gutters or repairing jammed windows) that will help ensure maximum visual appeal once your property is launched on the market for sale. We can even arrange to have the work done for you or put you in touch with reputable local tradespeople.

It delivers transparency

We pride ourselves on total transparency and efficient research. A Building and Timber Pest Inspection helps us understand your property – the best features and any issues that need to be addressed. It enables us to disclose any issues still outstanding, if they need to be disclosed.

Put yourself in the buyer’s shoes and imagine how confident you would feel about purchasing from a seller who has pre-arranged reports in which everything is disclosed. It would give you assurance knowing how much, if anything, you may need to budget to address any minor repairs. It would also highlight that the sellers have nothing to hide.

What if you don’t arrange a Building & Timber Pest Inspection?

While it is not a legal requirement to do so, more buyers these days are obtaining a Building and Timber Pest Inspection as part of the Contract. If a professional inspection identifies serious structural defects and/or live timber pests and/or damage due to previous pest activity and the seller is unable or unwilling to rectify the issues at their own expense, the buyer may terminate the Contract.

In our experience we rarely find any issue that can’t be resolved to everyone’s satisfaction.

Nothing beats total transparency, especially in terms of the sale or purchase of such a significant asset.

 


Comments (0)


Is it best to sell furnished or unfurnished?

by ShelMarkblog In Uncategorized

19 April 2018

If you were looking for a new home, would you prefer to inspect an empty home to assess the space available for your own furniture? Or would you prefer to see a furnished home?

Some people argue that an empty home lacks character and visual appeal, while others argue that styling an empty home is not worth it.

So, do houses sell better unfurnished or furnished? The truth is, there are pros and cons for both.

Pros of selling a house unfurnished

  • An unfurnished home is always uninhabited, meaning it can be shown at the last minute. This can equate to more viewings, potentially leading to a faster sale.
  • It creates a ‘blank canvas’ for buyers to use their imagination. Some buyers say an unfurnished home allows them to imagine themselves living there more readily than a furnished home.

Cons of selling a house unfurnished

  • As hard as it may be to believe, an empty house can actually appear smaller than a furnished home.
  • Empty houses can give the impression of being abandoned, prompting some buyers to question why the owners were in such a hurry to leave and sell.
  • An empty house emphasises all imperfections. Even small marks on the walls and floors are more visible without furniture and decorative touches in the room.

Pros of selling a house furnished 

  • It shows the buyer how the space can be used. Cleverly positioned furniture will actually make the space appear larger and more versatile.
  • It speaks to a buyer’s emotions, not just their logic and most homebuyers buy on emotion. A furnished, well-decorated (not cluttered) house makes it feel more like a home.
  • It is more likely to create a lasting first impression.

Cons of selling a house furnished

  • If you are in a hurry to move out, it can be an inconvenience to keep the house furnished or have furniture brought in.
  • Unless it is well furnished and styled, it can actually reduce the appeal of your home and the value of the property in the buyer’s mind.
  • Over furnishing a room may crowd it, making it seem smaller than it is.

We offer a professional styling service and have had great success with it in terms of increased property value and speed of sale. Contact us to learn more.


Comments (0)


Going up to downsize

by ShelMarkblog In Uncategorized

15 April 2018

If there is one thing we know about Melville it is that the suburb is full of large family-style homes and almost totally built-out (unlike neighbouring Cockburn).

In fact, Melville has more 5-bedroom + houses than almost any other suburb in Perth.

However, to cope with Perth’s rising population, Melville is required by State Government to make way for an additional:

• 11,000 dwellings by 2031 and
• 18,000 dwellings by 2050

So how can Melville keep its rapidly increasing aging population in place when there are few smaller homes in the suburb to downsize to and cope with the anticipated increase in population?

The Council has come up with a strategy that they believe could help solve the issue. And it involves going up.

The City of Melville’s new Local Housing Strategy focuses on increasing its limited housing stock by increasing apartment and townhouse construction around six activity centres and transport corridors, avoiding the suburbs, where council hopes to preserve the low-density R25 zoning as much as possible.

What do Melville residents want?

A survey to all Melville residents found that there is a strong desire to live near shops, restaurants and public transport, but little desire to live near work, a clear indication of the number of retirees or people approaching retirement currently living in the area.

Also high on the preference list was:

• Low maintenance
• Close to parks and nature

While there was limited support for apartment blocks above four storeys, it is believed that respondents may have been swayed by the current poor examples in Melville, which date back to the 1960s and 70s.

Data also showed that the rate of home ownership among seniors is dropping, due to the high cost of land in the area.

While nothing can be done by local government about the price of land, higher density housing around transport hubs and the town centre is a very effective solution.

Council will also keep a watchful eye on how Fremantle’s ‘Tiny Homes’ policy (granny flats in backyards) pans out, but is unlikely to follow Fremantle’s lead, at least not for now.


Comments (0)


Going up to downsize

by ShelMarkblog In Uncategorized

29 March 2018

If there is one thing we know about Melville it is that the suburb is full of large family-style homes and almost totally built-out (unlike neighbouring Cockburn).

In fact, Melville has more 5-bedroom + houses than almost any other suburb in Perth.

However, to cope with Perth’s rising population, Melville is required by State Government to make way for an additional:

  • 11,000 dwellings by 2031 and
  • 18,000 dwellings by 2050

So how can Melville keep its rapidly increasing aging population in place when there are few smaller homes in the suburb to downsize to and cope with the anticipated increase in population?

The Council has come up with a strategy that they believe could help solve the issue. And it involves going up.

The City of Melville’s new Local Housing Strategy focuses on increasing its limited housing stock by increasing apartment and townhouse construction around six activity centres and transport corridors, avoiding the suburbs, where council hopes to preserve the low-density R25 zoning as much as possible.

What do Melville residents want?

A survey to all Melville residents found that there is a strong desire to live near shops, restaurants and public transport, but little desire to live near work, a clear indication of the number of retirees or people approaching retirement currently living in the area.

Also high on the preference list was:

  • Low maintenance
  • Close to parks and nature

While there was limited support for apartment blocks above four storeys, it is believed that respondents may have been swayed by the current poor examples in Melville, which date back to the 1960s and 70s.

Data also showed that the rate of home ownership among seniors is dropping, due to the high cost of land in the area.

While nothing can be done by local government about the price of land, higher density housing around transport hubs and the town centre is a very effective solution.

Council will also keep a watchful eye on how Fremantle’s ‘Tiny Homes’ policy (granny flats in backyards) pans out, but is unlikely to follow Fremantle’s lead, at least not for now.

 


Comments (0)


Linen Closet Hacks – because presentation of every part of your home matters when selling

by ShelMarkblog In Uncategorized

23 March 2018

We all know presentation matters when you’ve got your home listed for sale. But there’s one area many sellers neglect to think about when preparing their home for sale and the all-important Home Opens – their cupboards, most notably one that is often the messiest, most disorganised cupboard in the house – the linen closet.

Storage is seen as a high value benefit

Most people who attend an Open Home open cupboards and drawers – with a focus on kitchen and bathroom cupboards, wardrobes and linen closets. This is because storage space in a home is seen as a high value benefit to most buyers.

Be honest. Is your linen closet a dumping ground for every single set of sheets and towels you’ve ever owned?

Do you struggle to find matching sheets and fold them neatly (especially the dreaded fitted sheets)?

Even if your linen closet space is not the largest, there are ways to make it appear far more spacious than it is by trying the following simple tips (as first shared on realestate.com.au by professional organiser, Robyn Amott).

7 tips to organise your linen closet into the functional space it’s meant to be

  1. Keep like with like items together, e.g. kids’ doona sets with single sheet sets, adult doona sets with queen/king sized sheet sets, etc.
  2. Separate each category into ‘zones’ by inserting extra shelves and/or dividers into the linen closet.
  3. Use very part of the space – the depth and height of your linen closet rather than just the width.
  4. Get rid of worn, ripped, stained or unwanted linen.
  5. Store items in sets and ‘envelope’ matching pillows inside the main doona or flat sheet. See the folding hack.
  6. Store away out-of-season linen or start packing linen into boxes ready for your move (but don’t be tempted to pack it all away – a well-sorted linen closet presents better to buyers than an empty one).
  7. Free up space in your linen cupboard by relocating towels into the bathrooms in which they are utilised.

Click here for a folding hack to show you how to neatly fold those sheet sets once and for all.

 


Comments (0)


Buying property with family – the do’s & don’ts

by ShelMarkblog In Uncategorized

15 March 2018

No matter how close you are to your parents, siblings or cousins and how well you get along, when you throw money and property into the mix, it can sometimes be a recipe for disaster. But that does not mean that buying with family should never be considered.

The fact is, there are some very attractive reasons for buying property with family, the most obvious being affordability.

By pooling your resources, you have the opportunity to either:

• Enter the property market for the first time when you couldn’t do it on your own, OR
• Invest in a better property in a better location and save on the ongoing costs of owning a property.

You just have to know the risks associated with buying property with family and how to avoid them. There are also some key considerations you need to know about.

The risks and how to avoid them

Look at your family objectively and ask the following questions (then discuss these concerns openly and honestly with each party):

1. Is there agreement amongst the members who want in on the purchase about the type of property and the budget involved in the purchase?
2. How will the family deal with the management of an investment property or a permanent place of residence?
3. If it is to be a permanent place of residence, how will the living arrangements work?
4. How open are the lines of communication? Open communication is key to successfully buying property with family.

The key considerations

1. Type of loan – Property Share Loan or Family Trust?
2. Management of the property – who will act as project manager of the investment?
3. The legal stuff – an official co-ownership agreement is a must.
4. Differing opinions – there are a number of things all parties must come to an agreement on if the shared investment is going to be successful.

Click here for the detail related to each of the above key considerations.


Comments (0)

      
« Prev  1 2 3 4 5 6  ...  Next » 
For Sale | About Us | For You | Contact Us | Home | Login
Disclaimer | Privacy Policy | Design Key2Creative | Member of REIWA